Tuesday, February 21, 2017

The Last of a Generation Gone


Doris Jean Meinzen Dray       
July 19, 1921 - February 20, 2017       

Though her given name was Doris Jean I knew her as Aunt Dot, a nickname given to her when she was a child.  She and her family lived not far from my house in Mineral Ridge until I was eight or nine.  I spent many hours at her home playing with her daughter, my cousin Belinda.  I grew up during a time when aunts did not hesitate to teach, train, and correct other children in the extended family.  I can't say she was like a second mother but in many ways she taught me just as she taught her daughter.

Until her death on Monday Aunt Dot was not only the oldest family member on my mother's paternal side of the family, including among cousins, she was also the last living relative descended from Henry and Elizabeth Armitage Meinzen who was born with the Meinzen surname.  Her death closes a generation in our family.

I became somewhat interested in family history when my mother was still alive and asked her many questions but a number of years after her death I became more devoted to family history research.  Aunt Dot became my go-to person when I had questions about individuals, relationships, locations, etc.  She was the third youngest of four sisters, born the year after her grandmother, Elizabeth Armitage Meinzen, died and four and a half years before her grandfather, Henry Meinzen died.  She had no memories of her grandmother, only a few of her grandfather, but she remembered many of her father's brothers and sisters and was able to fill in absences in records.  She and her sisters lived near her mother's parents, Edward Jesse and Mary Thompson Bickerstaff.  Aunt Dot was able to add anecdotal information to help bring those ancestors to life.

Knowing that I was a collector of postcards, Aunt Dot saved those she received and sent them on to me.  But not only postcards -- even better than postcards -- she sent snippets of memories of the experiences of her childhood and young adult life.  She did not write a conventional personal history but amongst those bits of paper, the story of her life is recorded.  She told me many years ago that when she thought of a childhood memory, she wrote it down in a journal or notebook.  I hope her son or one of her grandchildren finds and saves the notebook(s).

Though she'd become disinterested in food and eating (nothing tasted good, she said), Aunt Dot was doing well until this past Thanksgiving when she fell and broke a leg.  She was unable to stand, sit, or walk.  Even during the months after the fall she seemed in relatively good spirits.  Like any good Meinzen she carried on without complaint.  But this past Thursday she took a turn for the worse and was gone days later.

I will miss our phone conversations and her ready jokes, having someone to ask those pesky family history questions, and her packets in the mail.  But most of all I will miss knowing she's there.  She will be forever in my heart.

--Nancy.

Copyright ©2017 Nancy Messier. All Rights Reserved.
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Monday, February 20, 2017

Jefferson County, Ohio, Court Records at FamilySearch


Jefferson County Court Records, 1797-1947 at FamilySearch is a collection of browsable records.  Most of the early ones are handwritten, sometimes faded and light; some of the later ones are typewritten.  Below are the records available in this collection.
 
The 1880 Census is a volume of indexes of enumeration districts (E.D.).  Each index includes every name in alphabetical order (by first letter only) along with color, sex, and age.  There is no list or index at the beginning telling on which page to look for a particular E.D.

County Court Records
Civil Dockets 1852-1916
These are unindexed records in chronological order.  If you know an ancestor had a court case you may find a record of it in the civil dockets.  Knowing the date would be helpful.
Council Proceedings, 1823-1890
These are chronological records recording the council's discussion of physical and environmental changes and decisions for the governance of  the city of Steubenville:  bridges built or repaired; roads paved; gutters repaired or relaid; installation of street lights and water pipes; paving of sidewalks; creation of bond funds; ordinances concerning pawnbrokers, punishment of intoxicated persons, etc.; and appointments of city wardens, among other things.  Scattered throughout are the names of citizens of the city who were owed money or who were contracted for work.

Hospital Records:  County Infirmary record, 1889-1933 
At the front of this volume is a typed, alphabetical list of individuals included in the records.  This list includes name, race/sex, and (for most individuals) admit and discharge dates and birth and death dates.  Handwritten records begin at image 102.  Strangely enough, this ledger's entries span two pages with unnumbered lines.  You will need to count the lines down (or up) on each page to be sure you're looking at information for the same individual.

Land and Property Records includes three sets of records, all from the early 1900s.
        Cross Creek Township, Wayne Township and Steubenville city plat book, 1914
        Steubenville ward 4 plat book and assessment, 1910
        Wells Township district 19 plat book, 1914
There are plat maps and lists of owners with lot numbers, addition names, feet from the front and depth of lot in feet.  If you want to find information about property your an ancestor owned you will need to know the ward where the property was situated.  Otherwise, you can browse the books to see if you can find an ancestor.

Naturalization Records is a large collection with a variety of records.  Many are for the early 1900s but the range is from the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s.  The records include
        Declarations of intention
        Petitions for naturalization
        Petition evidence
        Citizenship granted or denied
        Minor citizenship records

Pension Records are Mother's Pensions between 1920 and 1936.  This is a not-to-be-missed collection if you are searching for widows with children during the above dates.  Some of these records are alphabetical typed lists, others are handwritten pages in folders that include the mother's application with name and address; a list to children and their birth dates; and information about the home.  The handwritten application requires the mother's birth date; location of birth; spouse's name, marriage date, and death date of spouse; report of an investigation by a probation officer that includes the names and locations of relatives. 

Probate Records is the largest group of records in this collection.  It includes
        Account records, 12 volumes, 1807-1866
        Administrator's application and bond, 7 volumes, 1885-1913
        Assignee's Bonds, 1883-1959
        Estate files (miscellaneous), 1873-1958 (most years)
        Estate files (recovered records), 1820-1930
        Estates case, 1797-1959.  Each is numbered but I saw no index.
        Guardian's application and bond, 5 volumes, 1893-1928
        Guardian's letters, 1894-1919
        Inventory of estates, 1889-1917
        Letters of administration, 1867-1913
        Letters testamentary, 1867-1924
        Ministers' licenses, 1874-1967
        Miscellaneous estates cases, 1879-1935
        Probate final record, 1889-1919
        Probate journal, 1852-1932
        Wills, 1899-1900

Vital Records is another large collection.  As you would guess, most records are hand-written, at least until later years.  Also, most subcollections are categorized by year, then numbered within the year.  Each category of delayed births opens with a list of names with record number for that subcollection.  The record of births has an alphabetical list (by first letter only) of surnames on the first pages of the volume.
        Coroner's Reports, 1887-1896, 1917-1951
        Delayed Births, 1867-1956 (most years)
        Marriage certificates, 1813-1850
        Record of births, 1895-1906

After looking through some of the records in these collections I feel grateful again for indexing that creates easy ways for us to locate records of our ancestors and for OCR which allows information about our ancestors to be found by typing a name in a search box and pressing enter.  This collection reminds me to be grateful for books with pages that can be read and turned.  That being said, I'm beyond grateful to have these images at my fingertips.

--Nancy.

Copyright ©2017 Nancy Messier. All Rights Reserved.
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Thursday, February 16, 2017

A Pestering Ancestor

Sometimes I get tired of my ancestors, especially when they keep pestering me to find them.  While working on an individual or family line, one ancestor from a completely different family will intrude in my thoughts and refuse to leave in peace.  It's almost as if he or she is saying, "Find me.  Find my records.  Don't forget about me."  I sometimes want to say, "Oh, just go away and leave me alone.  Can't you see I'm busy?" -- in a kind and gentle way, of course.  But I don't.  I make notes, I start thinking about where else I can look, what other options and scenarios may have taken place in the life of the pestering ancestor and to which records they may lead.  And I imagine saying to the ancestor, "How about a little help?  Do you think you could point me in the right direction, give me a hint or two?"

A few months ago, with his delightful Yorkshire accent, Abel Armitage nudged me.  I took myself to the Ohio Archives and searched through Steubenville newspapers (again) for more about the suit he and his wife, Ann, filed against the City of Steubenville. 
(Results of a previous search are posted here.)  The searches this time led to these four brief articles at right, all published in The Steubenville Weekly Herald.

The first was published on Friday, February 14, 1879.

The second on Friday, March 5, 1880, under "Assignment of Cases."

The third was published on Friday, April 8, 1881.


And the last on Friday, April 29, 1881.  This newspaper article is chronologically the last "document" I've found for Abel.


He began pestering me this week.  Perhaps he's aware that Ancestry's British records will be available free of charge this weekend and determined that it was time for me to begin searching for him again (for about the fourth or fifth time in eight or ten years).  It's almost become a game of hide and seek trying to find when and where he last lived and where he died.

What could have happened to Abel after this news article in 1881?  I haven't found him (or any documents for him) anywhere in Jefferson County, Ohio, after that date.  Possibilities include
  • a return to England with his wife.  He became a naturalized citizen in 1874 but maybe he was homesick.  After collecting the $207.84 settlement money would he have had enough to buy passage to England for himself and his wife? 
  • a move to a neighboring state:  West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Kentucky.  Abel was identified as disabled in the 1880 U.S. Census and would have been 60 in 1881.  A move would probably not have been easy, whether to a neighboring state or to England.
  • a coal mine accident, considering that he may have returned to coal mining as a breaker boy.
  • death as an unidentified man.

I don't know which possibility is more likely but since Ancestry UK is free this weekend and since Abel has been nudging me, I'll see if I can find him in England.

And then maybe, just maybe, he will quit pestering me for a while again.  But then, one of my other ancestors will probably pester for attention.

--Nancy.

Copyright ©2017 Nancy Messier. All Rights Reserved.
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Saturday, February 4, 2017

SNGF - The Facebook Meme

Randy's hosting another evening of Saturday Night Genealogy Fun at Genea-Musings.  (It seems like I'm having trouble actually working on family history but I can do this.  Ha!)  This week's challenge, should we choose to accept it, is to answer the following questions.

1. Who are you named after?
No one.  My mother chose another name but the nurse at the hospital didn't like it so my mom changed it.  She said she couldn't remember what the original name was.  I wish I knew if I were intended to be a Sarah or Teresa or Mary or ....

2. Last time you cried?
Last night.  A friend whom I haven't seen for 30 years emailed a photo of himself and his family. 

3. Do you like your handwriting?
It's okay.  If I took a little more time to write it would look better.

4. What is your favorite lunch meat?
Home roasted chicken or beef, but I'd rather eat grilled cheese for lunch than lunch meat.

5.  Spicy or sweet?
Sweet.
 
6. Longest relationship?
My whole lifetime with both my siblings and an aunt.

7. Do you still have your tonsils?
Yes.

8. Would you bungee jump?
Yes, I would love to.  What a thrill!

9. What is your favorite kind of cereal?
Homemade granola.  Love those cashews and honey mixed in with the oats.

10. Do you untie your shoes when you take them off?
None of my shoes have ties but if I wore shoes with ties I would untie them.

11. Do you think you're strong?
Physically?  Not so much these days but I think I used to be strong.  My hands are still strong, though.  People always brings me jars of food they can't open. 
Emotionally?  Yes, except I usually can't hold back tears.  And I'm super sensitive and have to guard against hurt feelings by talking myself out of and around what people have said.

12. Favorite ice cream?
Blue Bunny Bunny Tracks (on a Joy brand sugar cone).

13. What is the first thing you notice about a person?
General demeanor.

14. Football or baseball?
Neither.

15. What color pants are you wearing?
Navy blue jumper.

16. Last thing you ate?
Chocolate chip cookie.

17. What are you listening to?
"Concerto for Violin, Strings & Continuo No. 2 in E Major" by Johann Sebastian Bach on Pandora

18. If you were a crayon, what color would you be?
The next slightly darker color than "red."

19. What is your favorite smell?
Lavender, honeysuckle.

20. Who was the last person you talked to on the phone?
My daughter.

21. Hair color?
Greying brown (mostly grey).

22. Eye color?
Green.

23. Favorite foods to eat?
Roast beef or chicken with mashed potatoes and gravy; Trader Joe's caramelized onion cheese (which is especially good melted on bread or a croissant); chocolate chip cookies; Heggy's milk chocolate peanut patties....

24. Scary movies or happy endings?
Happy endings.

25. Last movie you watched?
"The Age of Adaline."

26. What color shirt are you wearing?
Navy.

29. What is your favorite holiday?
Christmas.

30. Beer or Wine?
No alcohol, thank you.

31. Night owl or morning person?
Night owl.

32. Favorite day of the week?
Sunday.

Thanks for the fun, Randy.  Do any of you readers want to participate the fun?  Copy the questions, answer, and post them.  Or save them in your journal.

--Nancy.
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Saturday, January 21, 2017

Presidents and Generations - SNGF

For this week's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun Randy Seaver of GeneaMusings suggested we determine how many presidents have held office during our lifetimes and the lifetimes of our grandparents.  Randy generously provided the link to PresidentsUSA, the source for my lists. 

I have lived while 13 men have been president (which makes me feel old -- until I realized that one of my ancestors lived through 23 presidencies!).
#33  Harry S. Truman
#34  Dwight D. Eisenhower
#35  John F. Kennedy
#36  Lyndon B. Johnson
#37  Richard M. Nixon
#38  Gerald R. Ford
#39  James E. Carter
#40  Ronald Reagan
#41  George H. W. Bush
#42  William J. Clinton
#43  George W. Bush
#44  Barack H. Obama
#45  Donald J. Trump

Lee Doyle (1913-1987), my father, lived during the leadership of 14 presidents.
#27  William H. Taft
#28  Woodrow W. Wilson
#29  Warren G. Harding
#30  Calvin Coolidge
#31  Herbert Hoover
#32  Franklin D. Roosevelt
#33  Harry Truman
#34  Dwight D. Eisenhower
#35  John F. Kennedy
#36  Lyndon B. Johnson
#37  Richard M. Nixon
#38  Gerald R. Ford
#39  James E. Carter
#40  Ronald Reagan

Audrey Meinzen Doyle (1915-1997), my mother, had one less president at the beginning of her life than my father but two more at the end of her life, so 15.
#28  Woodrow W. Wilson
#29  Warren G. Harding
#30  Calvin Coolidge
#31  Herbert Hoover
#32  Franklin D. Roosevelt
#33  Harry Truman
#34  Dwight D. Eisenhower
#35  John F. Kennedy
#36  Lyndon B. Johnson
#37  Richard M. Nixon
#38  Gerald R. Ford
#39  James E. Carter
#40  Ronald Reagan
#41  George H. W. Bush
#42  William J. Clinton

William Carl Robert Meinzen (1892-1979), my maternal grandfather, lived during 17 presidencies.
#23  Benjamin Harrison
#24  Grover Cleveland
#25  William McKinley
#26  Theodore Roosevelt
#27  William H. Taft
#28  Woodrow W. Wilson
#29  Warren G. Harding
#30  Calvin Coolidge
#31  Herbert Hoover
#32  Franklin D. Roosevelt
#33  Harry Truman
#34  Dwight D. Eisenhower
#35  John F. Kennedy
#36  Lyndon B. Johnson
#37  Richard M. Nixon
#38  Gerald R. Ford
#39  James E. Carter

Henry Carl Meinzen (1837-1925), my maternal great-grandfather, though not an American citizen until 1870, was alive during 22 presidencies.  He became a citizen during the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant.
  #7  Andrew Jackson
  #8  Martin Van Buren
  #9  William Henry Harrison
#10  John Tyler
#11  James K. Polk
#12  Zachary Taylor
#13  Millard Fillmore
#14  Franklin Pierce
#15  James Buchanan
#16  Abraham Lincoln
#17  Andrew Jackson
#18  Ulysses S. Grant
#19  Rutherford B. Hayes
#20  James A Garfield
#21  Chester Arthur
#22  Grover Cleveland
#23  Benjamin Harrison
#24  Grover Cleveland
#25  William McKinley
#26  Theodore Roosevelt
#27  William Howard Taft
#28  Woodrow Wilson

Dixon Bartley (1806-1900), my father's maternal great-grandfather, lived during the presidencies of 23 men.
  #3  Thomas Jefferson
  #4  James Madison
  #5  James Monroe
  #6  John Quincy Adams
  #7  Andrew Jackson
  #8  Martin Van Buren
  #9  William Henry Harrison
#10  John Tyler
#11  James K. Polk
#12  Zachary Taylor
#13  Millard Fillmore
#14  Franklin Pierce
#15  James Buchanan
#16  Abraham Lincoln
#17  Andrew Jackson
#18  Ulysses S. Grant
#19  Rutherford B. Hayes
#20  James A Garfield
#21  Chester Arthur
#22  Grover Cleveland
#23  Benjamin Harrison
#24  Grover Cleveland
#25  William McKinley

Augustine Bickerstaff (1759-1857), my maternal grandmother's great-great-grandfather (or my 4th great-grandfather), lived during 14 presidents.
  #1  George Washington
  #2  John Adams
  #3  Thomas Jefferson
  #4  James Madison
  #5  James Monroe
  #6  John Quincy Adams
  #7  Andrew Jackson
  #8  Martin Van Buren
  #9  William Henry Harrison
#10  John Tyler
#11  James K. Polk
#12  Zachary Taylor
#13  Millard Fillmore
#14  Franklin Pierce

No matter which lines I follow and how I calculate it, besides myself, I need six more generations to have lived during the presidency from the beginning of the United States until our current president.  The only woman on these lists is my mother, primarily because my female ancestors seemed to live shorter lives than the men.  (And I was searching for longevity to increase the number of presidents during their lifetimes.)

While compiling these lists for my ancestors I began to wonder to which men and parties they gave their allegiance, which proposed ideas that they believed were right and true.  Though the issues would have been very different from those in our time I wonder how my sympathies would have aligned (or not) with theirs in their lifetimes, and how theirs might align with mine now.

--Nancy.

Copyright ©2017 Nancy Messier. All Rights Reserved.
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Friday, January 20, 2017

Mrs. Titus on a Windy Day - Friday's Faces from the Past


Mrs. Titus is my grandmother's friend.  I have no first name, no information about how she came to know Mrs. Titus but I believe they must have been good friends because Gramma's album has nearly as many photos of Mrs. Titus as of any other one family member.

My guess for a date of this photo is the early to mid-1910s.  I notice that the house number if 222.  If a census taker recorded house numbers it could be a clue for the address but finding Mrs. Titus's first name and anything about her feels like searching for a needle in a haystack.

--Nancy.

Copyright ©2017 Nancy Messier. All Rights Reserved.
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Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Research Results Based on Hints in an Obituary

When I found an obituary for Sophia Meinzen Kropp, the supposed sister of my great-grandfather Henry Meinzen, I listed every possible hint in that obituary.  And then I researched based on the hints.  This post is a compilation of the results of that research.

Below are the results of following those hints.  

Hint 1)  died on September 6, 1920

Hint 2)  celebrated her 78th birthday on Saturday, September 4, 1920
  • Ohio death certificate gives birth date of September 4, 1842, which can be used to calculate her age (of 78)

Hint 3)  born in Germany 

Hint 4)  married Carl Kropp in Germany in 1861  
  • church record for Carl's death gives marriage date of September 14, 1863
  • Carl's obituary recorded that he married "Sophie Minsinger" in Germany but does not give a date


Hint 5)  immigrated from Germany to the U.S. in 1887 

Hint 6)  settled in Steubenville/Jefferson County upon arrival
  • Carl's obituary states that after arriving in 1887 they settled in "this city" (Steubenville).
  • Several of the children's obituaries (links below) suggest that they came directly to Steubenville but don't specifically state it.
  • I've no other information to substantiate this but it's possible that city directories may list Sophie and Carl.

Hint 7)  husband Carl Kropp died about 15 years ago (therefore about 1905) 
  • Carl appeared in the 1900 U.S. Census living with his wife, daughter Sophie, and son-in-law John Spahn
  • He is absent from the 1910 U.S. Census 
  • The name "Carl Kropt" appears in Jefferson County Probate Court death records with date of death as May 30, 1905.
  • His obituary appeared in The Steubenville Daily Gazette on Wednesday, May 31, 1905, giving a death date of May 30, 1905.
  • church record gives date of death as May 30, 1905

Hint 7)  Sophie was a member of Zion Lutheran Church
  • Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, now Zion United Christ Church, did not produce a membership record for Sophie nor have a record pertaining to her death. 

Hint 8)  She was survived by daughters Mrs. John Spahn and Mrs. Minnie Schuette, and son William Kropp, all of Steubenville
  • the 1900 U.S. Census notes that she was the mother of 6 children, 4 living
  • Carl's 1905 obituary lists four living children (Minnie, wife of Henry Shutti; William, Henry and Sophie, wife of John Spahn)
  • in the 1900 U. S. Census she was living with daughter Sophia and son-in-law John Spahn (She was listed as mother.)
  • in the 1910 U.S. Census she was listed as mother-in-law, living with Sophie and John Spahn
  • in the 1920 U.S. Census she was listed as grandmother, living with Sophie and John Spahn
  • informant on Ohio death certificate was Mrs. John Spahn but no relationship was noted.
  • Known Child #1  Minnie Kropp Schuette.  Minnie's obituary notes that she was born in Hanover, Germany, and is the daughter of Carl and Sophia "Meingen" Kropp who were also born in Germany.
  • Known Child #2  William Henry Kropp.  William's Ohio death certificate notes that he was born in Germany and that his mother was Sophia Meinsen Kropp, also born in Germany.
  • Known Child #3  Henry Kropp.  Henry's Ohio death certificate notes that he was born in Germany and was the son of Carl Kropp and Sophie "Don't Know."
  • Known Child #4  Sophia Kropp (Mrs. John) Spahn. 

Hint 9  Survived by brother Henry Meinzen
  • Henry Meinzen's daughter Isabelle Meinzen's wedding announcement lists as attendees Mr. and Mrs. Carl Cropp, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schuette, Mr. and Mrs. John Spahn, and Messrs. Henry and Will Kropp, but does not note a relationship.
  • I've yet to find any information that confirms this sibling relationship.

Comments
I think it's worthwhile to research hints in an obituary.  One may find a wealth of genealogical information.  None of my research on Sophia Meinzen Kropp makes a direct connection between her and my great-grandfather Henry Meinzen but if I had been searching to find more about Sophia without trying to make a connection to a sibling these searches produced great results.  In fact, Sophia's death certificate lists her father's name, and her husband's church record notes his parents' names and the location of his birth.  You never know what you'll find.

--Nancy.

Copyright ©2017 Nancy Messier. All Rights Reserved.
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Friday, January 6, 2017

Mrs. Titus - Friday's Faces From the Past


Mrs. Titus was my grandmother Emma Bickerstaff Meinzen's friend.  Other than that I know nothing about her but she seems to me to have a pleasant, serene appearance.  Grandma has photos of her from this age until she was older, sitting in a wheelchair.

I would like to know where and how they met and how they became friends.  Perhaps some day I will research her.

This image was scanned from a photo, about 1 1/2" square, found in my grandmother's photo album.

If someone related to Mrs. Titus happens to read this post I would love to hear from you!

--Nancy.

Copyright ©2017 Nancy Messier.  All Rights Reserved.
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Sunday, January 1, 2017

Happy New Year 2017, Family and Blogging Friends



My wish for you as the new year begins is health, happiness, friendship, love, and success in your family history endeavors.

Happy New Year to you and yours!

--Nancy.
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Saturday, December 31, 2016

The Highs of 2016

I have a tiny little blog and I won't embarrass myself by telling you how many (or how few) posts I wrote in 2016, nor will I tell you the number of views each of the top five posts had.  I will tell you that it's no surprise that only one of the most-viewed posts focuses on my family; the others are more general to genealogy research.  In reverse order these are the five most read posts of 2016 on My Ancestors and Me.

5th)  A Family Resemblance? - Friday's Faces from the Past
This post explores the possibility that a tiny photo in my grandmother's album is a photo of the mother of a cousin whose mother had died when she was two.  Did I imagine a family resemblance or is there really one?

4th)  The Best Place to Find a German Immigrant's Hometown
While researching the same supposed sister of the same great-grandfather, I learned the best place to find a German immigrant's hometown.  (Unfortunately, the best place did not have a record of her hometown.)

3rd) Travel in Steerage - Websites to Learn More
Having learned that the supposed sister of my great-grandfather and several of her family members travelled from Germany to the U.S. in steerage, I wanted to learn more about that method of travel and what the experience might have been like for them. 

3rd)  The Best Place to Find a German Immigrant's Hometown
While researching the same supposed sister of the same great-grandfather, I learned the best place to find a German immigrant's hometown.  (Unfortunately, the best place did not have a record of her hometown.)

2nd)  Another Kind of Genealogy Toolbox
Most of us probably think of genealogy toolboxes in terms of record collections (both online and/or in repositories), books, and other physical resources.  This post suggests tools of a different kind, one comprised of traits and attributes, both innate and learned.

1st)  Transcription and Translation of a Church Record Written in German
It seems I'm not the only one interested in translating and transcribing old German records.  This post had more views this year than any other.

I've been enjoying reading other bloggers' lists of their top posts of the year.

--Nancy.

Copyright ©2016 Nancy Messier. All Rights Reserved. .
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